Sentences on Christopher Williams, “The Production Line of Happiness”

The collection gives us an experience (white sand and palm beaches, a new haircut, the promise of a travel advertisement) while also exerting our attention to contemporary objects (objects whose existence emerged in the post-World War II economic boom). 

The images start becoming something else for me. A thick layer of performance and theatrics embeds itself inside the photographs. I wasn’t only looking at images whose subjects function for human delight, but I was looking at images whose function it is to perform, to display: images meaning to be a spectacle. 

An idea gently passes through, or rather a heightened awareness? that photography (as a tool) has been used to function as a method to feed consumer culture.

Compare it to the historical use of photography (or rather photography’s beginning): the act of photographing was purely used for documentation purposes. Images in present cultures are being used more for the consumption of its representation rather than for its record. 

Williams reveals photography as a stage and superior playhouse. An array of mundane photos of mundane things which serve more than just being a picture of a “delight” but images that serve capitalist society and commercial purposes, pictures which aren’t cultivated but meant to be swallowed and ingested.

production line of happiness christopher williams

"Then I felt that every inflection of my voice, every word in my mouth, was a lie, a play whose sole purpose was to cover emptiness and boredom. There was only one way I could avoid a state of despair and a breakdown. To be silent. And to reach behind the silence for clarity or at least try to collect the resources that might still be available to me."
- Persona (1966) dir. by Ingmar Bergman

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via apricotpicked)

ingmar bergman

Christian Marclay
Telephones, 1995

A 7 1/2 minute compilation of Hollywood film clips, Telephones demonstrates the transformative power of Marclay’s editing. Using the narrative arc of a telephone call, he masterfully stitches together excerpts from well-known movies. A recent acquisition by the Museum, Telephones opens with scenes depicting characters dialing the telephone, an activity whose very mechanics, rhythms, and sonic properties have changed considerably with successive technologies. Artist and composer Christian Marclay crafts a new narrative from the fragments, one that offers astute observations on cinematic devices, but also outmoded social habits. In this mobile and interconnected age, the telephone, it seems, no longer serves as the site – physical and psychological – that it once did. - Bowdoin

christian marclay telephones 1995 video art swiss visual artists technology age phones visual artists

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:


Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)

(via adrienne-hp)

eleanor lutz